March 24, 2013

Tracks: J.C. Satàn - The Moon / The Sun

J.C. Satàn lay down two heavy tracks on their split with Piresian Beach.

If you couldn't already tell, J.C. Satàn doesn't give a fuck. Comprised of two ladies from Italy and three guys from France, the Slovenly band has put out many releases; each showcasing a different facet of their personality. Their 2010 full-length Sick of Love exhibited a smokey void of hell that is actually pretty cool in a demonic, punk rock way. While this album and their most recent album Faraway Land was primarily lead by the vocals of the band's main songwriter Arthur Satàn, their contribution to a split 7" with Piresian Beach pushes lyricist Paula H. front and center.

The first striking thing about this is the weird artwork made by Paula H. It looks like a bad acid trip in a neon-colored alternate universe – and a dead girl is thrusting into a satanic cat penis? I don't know but it works. One half Japanese folktale and one half ancient Greek history, J.C. Satàn's side of the split explores polar opposites "the moon" and "the sun." It's clear from the song's title and lyrics that "Taketori Monogatari (The Moon)" is based on The Tale of the Bamboo Cutter. According to legend, a mysterious girl is found as a baby in the stalk of a glowing bamboo tree and later reveals she is from the capital of the moon. Like the myth, fantasy-like energy flickers through the beaming psych-pop chorus "you bring light to this darkness / cause you come from the moon." Second track "The Colossus of Rhodes (The Sun)" is also pretty self-explanatory; somewhat of a historical account of Rhodes' victory over the ruler Cyprus. The Colossus of Rhodes (a statue of Helios, Greek god of the Sun) was built to commemorate this triumph at 100 ft until an earthquake destroyed it around 226 BC. This track, a heavy rock ballad to the battle and Helios, lives up to its epic namesake with Paula's gritty garage vocals layered on top of dark, grungey guitars.

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Listen to more J.C. Satàn on bandcamp.

Written by Diana Cirullo